College Admissions: Don’t Do This!

This is the cliff notes of our podcast with Hannah Tung past college admissions counselor and now a professor at a major Christian college.  If these cliff notes look interesting, listen to the podcast for the full details!

 

1. Unprofessional References- like Jesus. References are very important to the process and colleges take them seriously. This is not a time to do creative writing. Also, know that the people you write down on references will be very honest. Take them out for coffee before they write the reference you can communicate your desires and your heart for your future to your reference.

2. Only give what is asked for. If they ask for three references, give only three.

3. A big part of the application process comes after you submit your application. Visiting the campus, phone calls

4. Be professional and respectful in all circumstances.  Address the college staff by their full name and don’t be too familiar with the staff you have just met.

5. Dress appropriately.

6. Be open enough to ask your friends what they think of your teenage student to see if there are character flaws that may hurt his college admission interview. Treat a friend to Starbucks and ask them to do a mock interview with your student.

7. Essays matter. Both in content and grammar.

The biggest takeaway is that essays, academics, and life experiences all matter. Don’t pay attention to only one area, assuming that will get you into your 1st choice college.

 

 

 

Does Curriculum Matter For College Applications?

With Guest Speaker, Hannah Tung.  Hannah was first a college admissions officer and is now a professor at an accredited private college. She has experienced all sides of college admittance and student performance in college.

Our ultimate goal may not be to have our kids go to college, but it doesn’t hurt to think towards that goal until it becomes clear which direction your student will go.

  1. Unless you are going to an Ivy League college, the school doesn’t care what curriculum you used. All they care about is did you learn the subject to the entry level standard for college.
  2. If you plan on doing a heavy math degree, then yes, you should choose an upper-level math program in high school to help with that.
  3. It is more important to keep a record of your student’s subjects and transcripts the moment the kids are in 9th Start in 7th grade to practice and get it down by 9th grade. You can ask for a sample transcript from your local high school.
  4. Your school name doesn’t matter, so have fun with it! What matters is that you stay consistent with writing the name of your school on all forms and application. The one piece that connects all random documents together is the original application, with the school name on it.
  5. The professionalism of your transcript is much more important! The formatting and look of the transcript is important and you should do what you can to make it look as professional and “mainstream” as possible.
  6. It is evident when students have been given higher grades on their transcripts than what was the appropriate grade once the student is in class. Give your kid the correct and honest grades!
  7. Homeschoolers fail in being able to listen to a lecture, take notes, and write a paper on the lecture. Due to mom sitting across the dining table with a reading based program, it’s important to train your upper-level high schooler to be able to do lectures. Watch Ted Talks or listen to Podcasts and assign a paper on them. This will greatly help their college-level learning.
  8. Running start or Dual Enrollment programs are wonderful! Most universities look at transfer students differently. It really differs on the college and degree desired on if they prefer transfer students or not.
  9. Take your students to the schools they are interested in! It really helps to make decisions.
  10. Call the college to ask what they are looking for in good applicants. Colleges are happy to give you all sorts of information!